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A man who assisted in autopsies in a big urban hospital, starting in the mid-1950s, describes the many deaths from botched abortions that he saw. “The deaths stopped overnight in 1973.” He never saw another in the 18 years before he retired. “That,” he says, “ought to tell people something about keeping abortion legal.”

“The Way It Was” — Mother Jones Magazine — Abortion before Roe v. Wade. (via feministteapot)

Never forget: Roe v. Wade wasn’t the beginning of abortion in America. It was the beginning of the end of illegal abortions. If you haven’t read this piece before, I highly recommend it.

(via thebicker)

(Source: gotthatglitteronmyeyes)

i-jaz:

When people are abused and assaulted, it is like the doors to their souls slam shut. The goal of Joyful Heart is to let the light, and the life, back in—to banish the darkness and let the healing begin.

- Mariska Hargitay, Founder & President of the Joyful Heart Foundation

- See more at: http://joyfulheartfoundation.org/

(Source: sculllyyy)

carmenrios:

don’t f*ck with the remakes. 

The question is not whether or not abstinence-only education is working. I’m not even sure what proponents of it mean by “working.” In the incarnation I’m familiar with, it certainly doesn’t seem intended to do much beyond shaming kids into not having sex using the crudest, most psychologically destructive means available. Research is pretty clear that it’s not even managing to accomplish that. The only thing abstinence-only education is accomplishing is entrenching misogynistic, licentious attitudes toward sex in a whole new generation of kids.

…You don’t need to defend abstinence-only sex ed from attacks by girls like Elizabeth Smart; you need to defend girls like Elizabeth Smart from the psychological effects of abstinence-only sex ed.

Calah Alexander, here. (via hellyeahscarleteen)
hellogiggles:

ILLUSTRATED TWEET OF THE DAYby Maritza Lugo http://bit.ly/YdhCsr

Everyone should know this about me.

9 Dry Shampoo Do’s and Don’ts

birchbox:

image

Avoid ending up on one of Glamour’s cringe-worthy Don’t Lists with these dry shampoo guidelines.

Much like vivid red lipstick or potent perfume, dry shampoo can totally backfire if used incorrectly. You know what we mean: sticky, greasy-looking locks and lackluster volume. It takes practice, but once you’ve harnessed the product’s awesome revitalizing powers, it’s a game-changer. Impromptu cocktail hours? Bring ‘em on. Spin class-deflated locks? Fear not. With Serge Normant’s Meta Revive Dry Shampoo as our prime test subject, we’ve put together a compendium of dry shampoo do’s and don’ts.

Dry Shampoo Do’s

1. Do: Rotate different formulas. Stocking an arsenal of varying products, from aerosol sprays to loose powders, will help you tackle every hair gripe. We love to attack our AM bedhead with Batiste’s super powdery dry shampoo and boost volume with Serge Normant’s thick, texturizing spray right before hitting happy hour. P.S. According to office lore, cofounder Katia uses a different dry shampoo every day to score her signature, bouncy locks.

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Very good to know!

nbcparksandrec:

TIME.AFTER.TIME.

Always reblog.

(Source: mandoir)

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